Gene Dolgoff

Holography Pioneer
CEO/CTO, Holobeam Technologies, Inc. }
Mr. Dolgoff is best known as the man who invented the LCD projector. However, for science-fiction fans, he is known as the man who conceived of the Star Trek Holodeck and got it added into the Star Trek shows. As a good friend of science fiction writer Isaac Asimov, he was introduced to Arthur C. Clarke and had the opportunity to influence his science fiction writing. He has decades of experience in Coherent Optics, 3-D Imaging, computer programming, and brain and neural processing science.

Gene built the first holography laboratory in New York City in 1964 where he invented holographic transfer printing, used for security on credit cards, before founding Projectavision, Inc., the world’s first digital projector company, in 1988, raising $20 million (listed on NASDAQ in 1990), and starting the multi-billion dollar digital projection industry, where he worked on the development of the U.S. HDTV system standard. In the 1980s he developed holographic medical imaging technologies using Ultrasound, X-rays, CT, and MRI, culminating in his working with the inventor of the MRI at Fonar Corporation. Mr. Dolgoff founded and became CEO/CTO of The 3D Source, Inc. (which created 3-D moving imagery for advertising, promotions, medical imaging, etc.), and 3-D Vision, Inc. (which develops 3-D TV technologies, and holographic video projection systems). He is currently developing Holographic Energy Teleportation, which has many potential applications, including the treatment of various diseases, at his current company, Holobeam Technologies, Inc. He has published several technical papers, has over 65 patents granted worldwide, is developing a new theory of gravity and the holographic universe, and is currently writing a book on the human brain.

Gene Dolgoff was educated, and later taught a holography course he authored, at the City College of the City University of New York, where he majored in Physics, Mathematics, and Electrical Engineering, and minored in physiological-psychology. He studied computer science, math, and astronomy at Columbia University in New York.